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a career development professional will use various tools to help you evaluate your interests, personality,... and values.
A. … credit card details, please? B. It’s a MasterCard. The number is …
after graduation from high school over half of american studentsenter institutions of higher education. the system of higher education inthe usa includes four categories of institutions: a community college, atechnical training institution, a four-year college and a university. 24generally speaking, there is not much difference between theseinstitutions of higher education. usually, a university is larger than acollege - it offers a greater variety of subjects to specialize in. moreover,a university offers special programmes of advanced studies in additionto fundamental programmes. there are … categories of institutions in the usa.
after they... they cleared the table.
all in all, the internet is here to stay and whether it... our life is up to us.
A low price is important, but good … will make customers happy, even when a product breaks.
although the sun was shining, it was still cold, because it … hard for two hours.
A. … my new camera. B. Oh dear. I’m sorry to hear that.
andres: … viral videos can be very effective.
And what … now?
anya: lydia, what do you think? lydia: …
anya: … mona: why? anya: because of the budget cuts
anya: ok, it’s ten o’clock and everyone’s here. …
A. … Pascal’s is the best restaurant. The food is delicious. B. Yes, I agree. The food is great.
… are the oldest universities in britain.
at 10 o'clock in the morning on wednesday tom … a delegation in the office.
A. … the target market? B. It’s aimed at stylish young men who want to look good.
at last kate came. i... for two hours.
A. … training to do my job properly. B. I’m sorry. It’s just not possible.
at that time, the company … interactive software for teaching history to primary school students.
At that time, the company … interactive software for teaching history to primary school students.
at the same time, remember that money is also important for you need it to survive. so, if a job is all... but no pay, things can get difficult.
at the same time, remember that money is also important for you need it to survive. so, if a job is all... but no pay, things can get difficult.
beatta, this is layla.
Before you get on the plane, you can … some shopping.
before you start choosing a perfect career, you need to know yourself first. but sometimes all this self-analysis leads to
but if you do not enjoy what you do then you are wasting a large part of your life.
but i … management at university. my degree is in history.
Can I have an aisle …?
Can I speak to Jorge Ramos, please?
Can I take this as hand …?
can you give me a 10 per cent … if i buy in bulk?
can you recommend a hotel that has meeting rooms for hire at … prices?
catherine is studying law at the university, and so … nick.
choose the right variant the food that ann is cooking in the kitchen … delicious.
choose the right variant we called our friends in london yesterday to tell them about the reunion that we ….
choose the right variant when mark arrived, the johnsons … dinner, but stopped in order to talk to him.
choose the right variant while tom … a book, marhta … tv.
choose true sentence according to the text. homemaking... every family needs a homemaker. whether this is the mum or dad, or part-time from both is irrelevant. in our family, we chose the traditional role for me to stay at home, but some families choose the reverse, especially if the woman has the better-paid job. we have actually experienced both since i had to work full-time when my husband was made redundant and stayed at home for a time. the days when the person staying at home to look after the house and family was thought of as being "just a housewife" have long gone, especially now that there is a role reversal and it is sometimes the man who stays home. nowadays there is a lot of pride in being the "homemaker". it is one of the most worthwhile careers and the rewards, although not financial, are great. the family benefits from quality time from one parent all the time.
choose true sentence according to the text. homemaking…every family needs a homemaker. whether this is the mum or dad, or part-time from both is irrelevant. in our family, we chose the traditional role for me to stay at home, but some families choose the reverse, especially if the woman has the better-paid job. we have actually experienced both since i had to work full-time when my husband was made redundant and stayed at home for a time. the days when the person staying at home to look after the house and family was thought of as being "just a housewife" have long gone, especially now that there is a role reversal and it is sometimes the man who stays home. nowadays there is a lot of pride in being the "homemaker". it is one of the most worthwhile careers and the rewards, although not financial, are great. the family benefits from quality time from one parent all the time.
choose true sentence according to the text. homemaking... so, after my first baby arrived, i felt for years that i had the perfect job. i was my own boss. i could work when i wanted and have a rest when i wanted. if i didn't feel like cleaning or doing the shopping and wanted to have a day off, that was fine. nobody else would have to be asked to cover for me, my work could wait until i was ready to do it. oh yes, it was hard work taking care of our home and our children and the hours were long, but the work was varied and very rewarding. in fact, being a homemaker was the perfect job for me. i was absolutely happy being a housewife and mum. watching my children thrive, witnessing their first steps, hearing their first words and all the other milestones were worth more than any amount of money.
choose true sentence according to the text. homemaking…so, after my first baby arrived, i felt for years that i had the perfect job. i was my own boss. i could work when i wanted and have a rest when i wanted. if i didn't feel like cleaning or doing the shopping and wanted to have a day off, that was fine. nobody else would have to be asked to cover for me, my work could wait until i was ready to do it. oh yes, it was hard work taking care of our home and our children and the hours were long, but the work was varied and very rewarding. in fact, being a homemaker was the perfect job for me. i was absolutely happy being a housewife and mum. watching my children thrive, witnessing their first steps, hearing their first words and all the other milestones were worth more than any amount of money.
Complete each gap in these short conversations. … do you work? At Channel 10.
Complete each gap in these short conversations. … you a sales manager? No, I’m not. I work in television.
Complete each gap in these short conversations. … your job? I’m Director of Advertising.
Complete each gap in these short restaurant conversations. Are there any Chinese dishes? Yes. You should … the duck.
Complete each gap in these short restaurant conversations. Do you … any vegetarian dishes? Yes, we have vegetarian pizza.
Complete each gap in these short restaurant conversations. What do you … for the main course? The beef is delicious.
Complete each of the questions
Complete each of the questions
Complete each of the questions
Complete each of the questions
Dessert: …
Do you like football?
Do you meet your colleagues after work?
do you mind if i take a brochure?
Do you want a room with a bath? …
every business needs accountants so there are a lot of career … for fawaz.
experts agreed that his behaviour … by the stress.
fawaz makes … as an accountant
fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the verbs. i … in novgorod for three months and i'm enjoying life here very much.
fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the verbs. i'm learning russian and l can already understand what people around me are talking about. "but i find it really difficult to speak russian . i … the course by the end of the year and hope i feel more confident with this language.
fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the verbs. i'm living in a small hotel at the moment, but i … to a flat next week. i've asked a friend of mine to share it with me.
fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the verbs. i've been working as a manager since i … and i find it really interesting.
fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the verbs. you said you … to see me this christmas.
Five years ago, businessman Simon Woodroffe had a good idea. He was in bed in first class on an international flight when he decided to open a hotel. The bed in the aeroplane gave him an idea. He could open a hotel with rooms like the sleeping area in an aeroplane. Now travellers in some of Britain’s airports sleep in these small, low-cost rooms. The rooms are very small, only seven square metres, but they are very convenient. They are in the airport, so travellers who want only a night’s sleep and a shower can save money and travelling time. Woodroffe calls his hotel ‘Yotel’. Each room has a TV, a desk and a shower and costs £50. You can pay £70 for a bigger room that has a couch. Press a button, and the couch changes to a bed. The small rooms are very popular with travellers. Woodroffe thinks he will open more Yotels in city centres. An important feature of the Yotel is convenience.
Five years ago, businessman Simon Woodroffe had a good idea. He was in bed in first class on an international flight when he decided to open a hotel. The bed in the aeroplane gave him an idea. He could open a hotel with rooms like the sleeping area in an aeroplane. Now travellers in some of Britain’s airports sleep in these small, low-cost rooms. The rooms are very small, only seven square metres, but they are very convenient. They are in the airport, so travellers who want only a night’s sleep and a shower can save money and travelling time. Woodroffe calls his hotel ‘Yotel’. Each room has a TV, a desk and a shower and costs £50. You can pay £70 for a bigger room that has a couch. Press a button, and the couch changes to a bed. The small rooms are very popular with travellers. Woodroffe thinks he will open more Yotels in city centres. His first hotels were in the United States.
Five years ago, businessman Simon Woodroffe had a good idea. He was in bed in first class on an international flight when he decided to open a hotel. The bed in the aeroplane gave him an idea. He could open a hotel with rooms like the sleeping area in an aeroplane. Now travellers in some of Britain’s airports sleep in these small, low-cost rooms. The rooms are very small, only seven square metres, but they are very convenient. They are in the airport, so travellers who want only a night’s sleep and a shower can save money and travelling time. Woodroffe calls his hotel ‘Yotel’. Each room has a TV, a desk and a shower and costs £50. You can pay £70 for a bigger room that has a couch. Press a button, and the couch changes to a bed. The small rooms are very popular with travellers. Woodroffe thinks he will open more Yotels in city centres. The rooms cost a lot of money.
Five years ago, businessman Simon Woodroffe had a good idea. He was in bed in first class on an international flight when he decided to open a hotel. The bed in the aeroplane gave him an idea. He could open a hotel with rooms like the sleeping area in an aeroplane. Now travellers in some of Britain’s airports sleep in these small, low-cost rooms. The rooms are very small, only seven square metres, but they are very convenient. They are in the airport, so travellers who want only a night’s sleep and a shower can save money and travelling time. Woodroffe calls his hotel ‘Yotel’. Each room has a TV, a desk and a shower and costs £50. You can pay £70 for a bigger room that has a couch. Press a button, and the couch changes to a bed. The small rooms are very popular with travellers. Woodroffe thinks he will open more Yotels in city centres. The Yotel showers are …
Five years ago, businessman Simon Woodroffe had a good idea. He was in bed in first class on an international flight when he decided to open a hotel. The bed in the aeroplane gave him an idea. He could open a hotel with rooms like the sleeping area in an aeroplane. Now travellers in some of Britain’s airports sleep in these small, low-cost rooms. The rooms are very small, only seven square metres, but they are very convenient. They are in the airport, so travellers who want only a night’s sleep and a shower can save money and travelling time. Woodroffe calls his hotel ‘Yotel’. Each room has a TV, a desk and a shower and costs £50. You can pay £70 for a bigger room that has a couch. Press a button, and the couch changes to a bed. The small rooms are very popular with travellers. Woodroffe thinks he will open more Yotels in city centres. Travellers …
Five years ago, businessman Simon Woodroffe had a good idea. He was in bed in first class on an international flight when he decided to open a hotel. The bed in the aeroplane gave him an idea. He could open a hotel with rooms like the sleeping area in an aeroplane. Now travellers in some of Britain’s airports sleep in these small, low-cost rooms. The rooms are very small, only seven square metres, but they are very convenient. They are in the airport, so travellers who want only a night’s sleep and a shower can save money and travelling time. Woodroffe calls his hotel ‘Yotel’. Each room has a TV, a desk and a shower and costs £50. You can pay £70 for a bigger room that has a couch. Press a button, and the couch changes to a bed. The small rooms are very popular with travellers. Woodroffe thinks he will open more Yotels in city centres. Woodroffe had an idea when he was sleeping in an airport.
Five years ago, businessman Simon Woodroffe had a good idea. He was in bed in first class on an international flight when he decided to open a hotel. The bed in the aeroplane gave him an idea. He could open a hotel with rooms like the sleeping area in an aeroplane. Now travellers in some of Britain’s airports sleep in these small, low-cost rooms. The rooms are very small, only seven square metres, but they are very convenient. They are in the airport, so travellers who want only a night’s sleep and a shower can save money and travelling time. Woodroffe calls his hotel ‘Yotel’. Each room has a TV, a desk and a shower and costs £50. You can pay £70 for a bigger room that has a couch. Press a button, and the couch changes to a bed. The small rooms are very popular with travellers. Woodroffe thinks he will open more Yotels in city centres. Woodroffe thinks Yotel will succeed …
Five years ago, businessman Simon Woodroffe had a good idea. He was in bed in first class on an international flight when he decided to open a hotel. The bed in the aeroplane gave him an idea. He could open a hotel with rooms like the sleeping area in an aeroplane. Now travellers in some of Britain’s airports sleep in these small, low-cost rooms. The rooms are very small, only seven square metres, but they are very convenient. They are in the airport, so travellers who want only a night’s sleep and a shower can save money and travelling time. Woodroffe calls his hotel ‘Yotel’. Each room has a TV, a desk and a shower and costs £50. You can pay £70 for a bigger room that has a couch. Press a button, and the couch changes to a bed. The small rooms are very popular with travellers. Woodroffe thinks he will open more Yotels in city centres. Yotels are …
Five years ago, businessman Simon Woodroffe had a good idea. He was in bed in first class on an international flight when he decided to open a hotel. The bed in the aeroplane gave him an idea. He could open a hotel with rooms like the sleeping area in an aeroplane. Now travellers in some of Britain’s airports sleep in these small, low-cost rooms. The rooms are very small, only seven square metres, but they are very convenient. They are in the airport, so travellers who want only a night’s sleep and a shower can save money and travelling time. Woodroffe calls his hotel ‘Yotel’. Each room has a TV, a desk and a shower and costs £50. You can pay £70 for a bigger room that has a couch. Press a button, and the couch changes to a bed. The small rooms are very popular with travellers. Woodroffe thinks he will open more Yotels in city centres. Yotels have …
for business dinners with only five or six people, i like the … atmosphere of our local japanese restaurant
give me your credit card … and i’ll send your order today
… he … about the opera before?
… he … about the opera before?
He … it for an hour before I came.
hello, this is darren speaking. … i help you?
he or she will then show you how all these things, combined, play a role in choosing a career. you can also learn about a career by interviewing people who are already in that profession. once you have all the information you need, list out all the pros and cons of that particular job. look at the various ....
he’s hoping for a big career … : a job in the uk.
He wants to … a hotel for three nights in Taipei.
he works in the finance department of a multinational engineering …
his grandfather... from his job a year ago.
His grandfather … from his job a year ago.
How about a cup of tea?
how do you feel about duncan’s suggestion?
how long ... you ... kate?
how long ... you ...? since i was 17.
How many hours a week do you work?
How many nights are you staying? …
How much is it per night? …
how’s business?
How’s your business doing?
human rights day on 10 december 1948, the united nations general assembly adopted the universal declaration of human rights, which has become a (1) ... standard for defending and promoting human rights. every year on 10 december, human rights day marks the adoption of the universal declaration which states that "human beings are born with (2) ... rights and fundamental freedoms". in 2006, human rights day focused on (3) ... poverty as a matter of obligation, not of charity. poverty is (4) ... by human rights violations. the links between human rights and poverty should be obvious: people whose rights are (5) ... are more likely to be poor. generally they find it harder or impossible to participate in the labour market and have little or no access to (6) ... services and resources. meanwhile, the poor in many societies cannot enjoy their rights to education, health and housing simply (7) ... they cannot afford them. and poverty affects all human rights: for example, low income can prevent people from accessing education, which in turn inhibits their participation in public life and their ability to influence the policies affecting them. governments and those in a position of authority must (8) ... responsibility for dealing with poverty. the realisation of human rights – including the fight against poverty – is a duty, not a mere aspiration. read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gap (1).
human rights day on 10 december 1948, the united nations general assembly adopted the universal declaration of human rights, which has become a (1) ... standard for defending and promoting human rights. every year on 10 december, human rights day marks the adoption of the universal declaration which states that "human beings are born with (2) ... rights and fundamental freedoms". in 2006, human rights day focused on (3) ... poverty as a matter of obligation, not of charity. poverty is (4) ... by human rights violations. the links between human rights and poverty should be obvious: people whose rights are (5) ... are more likely to be poor. generally they find it harder or impossible to participate in the labour market and have little or no access to (6) ... services and resources. meanwhile, the poor in many societies cannot enjoy their rights to education, health and housing simply (7) ... they cannot afford them. and poverty affects all human rights: for example, low income can prevent people from accessing education, which in turn inhibits their participation in public life and their ability to influence the policies affecting them. governments and those in a position of authority must (8) ... responsibility for dealing with poverty. the realisation of human rights – including the fight against poverty – is a duty, not a mere aspiration. read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gap (2).
human rights day on 10 december 1948, the united nations general assembly adopted the universal declaration of human rights, which has become a (1) ... standard for defending and promoting human rights. every year on 10 december, human rights day marks the adoption of the universal declaration which states that "human beings are born with (2) ... rights and fundamental freedoms". in 2006, human rights day focused on (3) ... poverty as a matter of obligation, not of charity. poverty is (4) ... by human rights violations. the links between human rights and poverty should be obvious: people whose rights are (5) ... are more likely to be poor. generally they find it harder or impossible to participate in the labour market and have little or no access to (6) ... services and resources. meanwhile, the poor in many societies cannot enjoy their rights to education, health and housing simply (7) ... they cannot afford them. and poverty affects all human rights: for example, low income can prevent people from accessing education, which in turn inhibits their participation in public life and their ability to influence the policies affecting them. governments and those in a position of authority must (8) ... responsibility for dealing with poverty. the realisation of human rights – including the fight against poverty – is a duty, not a mere aspiration. read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gap (3).
i … a manager for the past ten years.
i … a very difficult day tomorrow. i need to prepare for the exam.
I ... a very good meeting with Jimmy Lee in Taipei.
i can’t help … late.
I don’t like to pay … when I order something. I prefer to pay when I receive the product.
i don’t print most e-mails because my company is trying to … waste in the office.
i feel terrible. i think i … to be sick.
if i have an important … to meet, i often start work at 8:00 in the morning and finish at 8:00 at night.
i... for a whole hour!
i … for the same company for my entire career and i couldn’t be happier with my job.
I … for you for more than one hour.
I ... from Spain.
I got a good deal when borrowed money to buy my car – I had one year’s …
i had a very heavy … last month but this month it isn’t too bad.
i hate people … in public.
i have a family and a lot of interests outside of work. overall, my quality of … is really good.
i have a small, comfortable office in my home and i really like being in control of my working …
i... here all my life.
i hope kate is coming soon. i... for two hours.
i’m a freelance accountant and bookkeeper for small businesses so obviously i meet a … that every business has.
I'm checking out today. Can I have the …, please?
‘i’m climbing the career … ,’ he says. ‘i want to be a manager.’
I … my breakfast.
in a real life situation it is not easy to start speaking with a complete stranger, a person in power or a child. the internet … your age, class and looks.
in a real life situation it is not easy to start speaking with a complete stranger, a person in power or a child. the internet... your age, class and looks.
i never drink wine or beer at a business dinner. in fact, i always just order … water.
… in the country for many years he spoke english without accent.
In the office, we all ... English.
… - is an artificially created situation that allows the researcher either to confirm or to refute the hypothesis under study.
… is important with big or heavy products, because you can’t take them home in your car.
… i smoke here?
I ... some suppliers.
Is there a car park?
Is there a direct …?
it has allowed many people to set up their own businesses. some of these people are very young, even under the age of 18.the workplace ... increasingly stressful for many people, with longer hours and polluted air in big cities.
I ... to Hong Kong on Thursday.
i … to the cinema but my friend persuaded me to stay.
i... to the news on television at nine o'clock last night
it … outside; i do not like to walk in such weather.
It’s raining. … you like to borrow my umbrella?
i... when my friend ...
I … you later, OK?
Karina is … but she lives and works in London.
kate has been working here .
Last night I … home at 11. I … supper and then … to bed.
Last week, I ... in Taiwan and Hong Kong.
listen! is that alicia playing? she … play the piano very well
liz, have you met dmitri?
long ago they ... most houses out of wood.
lunch meetings need to be very quick so i always choose a restaurant that i know will have … service.
Main course: …
manufacturing companies now do more to … the environment than they did in the past.
match the questions and answers.
mona: but a viral video lasts longer. and we definitely want to reach the younger end of the market. andres: why do we have to choose one or the other? …
moreover, career choices cannot be made based on just a few criteria alone. your job may carry great monetary .... and perks.
most supermarkets offer a … scheme with reward points.
most supermarkets offer a … scheme with reward points.
Mr Albert … to meetings.
My boss ... from Sweden.
my colleagues usually … four days a week, and tills week they … five days.
My company ... very big.
My new camera has …. If it stops working, the maker will repair or replace it.
My suggestion is to go for a cocktail.
my train leaves at 6:00 so i … be at the station before 5:50.
my train leaves at 6:00 so i … be at the station before 5:50.
Next week, she’s moving to a new flat because her old one is … from the office.
Now I … for a taxi.
on 10 december 1948, the united nations general assembly adopted the universal declaration of human rights, which has become a (1) ... standard for defending and promoting human rights. every year on 10 december, human rights day marks the adoption of the universal declaration which states that "human beings are born with (2) ... rights and fundamental freedoms". in 2006, human rights day focused on (3) ... poverty as a matter of obligation, not of charity. poverty is (4) ... by human rights violations. the links between human rights and poverty should be obvious: people whose rights are (5) ... are more likely to be poor. generally they find it harder or impossible to participate in the labour market and have little or no access to (6) ... services and resources. meanwhile, the poor in many societies cannot enjoy their rights to education, health and housing simply (7) ... they cannot afford them. and poverty affects all human rights: for example, low income can prevent people from accessing education, which in turn inhibits their participation in public life and their ability to influence the policies affecting them. governments and those in a position of authority must (8) ... responsibility for dealing with poverty. the realisation of human rights – including the fight against poverty – is a duty, not a mere aspiration. read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gap (4).
On the flight, you can always … a movie.
Oscar … from home.
our … profit is lower this year because sales are down.
Please take me to the city …
police psychologists… many roles in the police force.
…psychology studies behaviour.
read the sentences. choose the correct answer. a police psychologist is trained in psychology, public safety and law enforcement. they do everything from participating in criminal investigations to performing psychological autopsies to interviewing suspects. a police psychologist studies…
read the sentences. choose the correct answer. contemporary psychology is interested in an enormous range of topics, looking at human behavior and mental process from the neural level to the cultural level. psychologists study human issues that begin before birth and continue until death. by understanding the history of psychology, you can gain a better understanding of how these topics are studied and what we have learned thus far. contemporary psychology studies…
read the sentences. choose the correct answer. during the mid-1800s, a german physiologist named wilhelm wundt was using scientific research methods to investigate reaction times. his book published in 1874, "principles of physiological psychology," outlined many of the major connections between the science of physiology and the study of human thought and behavior. wilhelm wundt’s book outlined …
read the sentences. choose the correct answer. freud believed that events in our childhood have a great influence on our adult lives, shaping our personality. for example, anxiety originating from traumatic experiences in a person's past is hidden from consciousness, and may cause problems during adulthood. freud believed our personality is shaped by…
read the sentences. choose the correct answer. when you smile, you demonstrate that you have noticed the person in a positive manner. the other person will usually feel good and smile back. smiling does not mean that you are happy all the time. you just demonstrate an open attitude to conversation. what does it mean when you are smiling to another person?
read the texts and match them with the headings. there is one extra title. every family needs a homemaker. whether this is the mum or dad, or part-time from both is irrelevant. in our family, we chose the traditional role for me to stay at home, but some families choose the reverse, especially if the woman has the better-paid job. we have actually experienced both since i had to work full-time when my husband was made redundant and stayed at home for a time. the days when the person staying at home to look after the house and family was thought of as being "just a housewife" have long gone, especially now that there is a role reversal and it is sometimes the man who stays home. nowadays there is a lot of pride in being the "homemaker". it is one of the most worthwhile careers and the rewards, although not financial, are great. the family benefits from quality time from one parent all the time.
read the texts and match them with the headings. there is one extra title. "i don't know how you stay at home all day... i would be bored out of my mind", was a comment i often heard when i stayed at home. was i bored? never! i mastered the housework so that i wasn't a slave to it. obviously, there was the cleaning to be done regularly but it was the sharing of the tidying up that made the difference. my family learnt to tidy up after themselves and if there was a bit of accumulated dust it would wait until the end of the week when a day was set aside for a thorough cleaning. i established a routine for the necessary chores that had to be done daily, but if they weren't completed by lunchtime, they were left until the next day. that way i had time to pursue my own interests and to spend time with the children as well.
read the texts and match them with the headings. there is one extra title. there were financial downsides of course to staying at home. new clothes and regular hairdos were a luxury. social outings were those which included the family, perhaps going for a walk in the countryside, or taking a picnic. expensive meals in restaurants were way beyond our means and out of the question. after my second child my former boss asked if i would consider returning to work. the salary would have been very welcome but there was no way anyone was going to look after my children except me, until they were old enough to go to school. money was less important to me than my family. besides, i would still have to pay someone to care for my children.
… Ricardo drive to work?
… Ricardo drive to work?
right now, he works in … in bahrain. he works hard because he wants a promotion. ‘i need more experience’ he says.
she … at the parcel long enough, before she … that it was for her brother.
She … her work already.
She’s a very … person – she likes to be on time.
She started her job last year, … April.
… she travel in her job?
so when i … university, i … a job in it.
Starter: …
the biggest concern about people using the internet is ... addicted to it.
the boy … convince the teacher of his innocence.
the boy sitting next to me on the plane was nervous because he ... before.
The company ... around 40 employees.
‘the company has its head …. in london,’ he says. ‘i study english every day because i want a job there.’
The company … only four people and they all work in one office.
the date of the meeting … yesterday.
The employees ... from about 15 different countries.
the general pattern of teaching at the universities remains a mixtureof lectures, seminars and tutorials. each student has a tutor who isresponsible for the student's progress. tuition fees are high. the studentsreceive grants from public and private funds, which provide for thepayment of their tuition fees and other expenses. each university anddepartment has its own method of assessment, but, in general, progressis measured through a combination of coursework, dissertation andfinals (end-of-course examinations). … responsible for the student's progress.
the government … the whole project.
the internet has changed people's life dramatically. it has allowed people from all over the world ... with each other and express their ideas and opinions.
the internet has changed people's life dramatically. it has allowed people from all over the world … with each other and express their ideas and opinions.
the internet offers other alternatives, such as working from home and online shopping. today you ... go out to buy goods or earn money.
the irish travellers are the largest minority in ireland. there are about 25,000 irish travellers in ireland and 1,300 in northern ireland. they are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into irish society. among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. the irish travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of india and is now widespread throughout europe. but the irish travellers are indigenous to ireland, so the two cultures are not related. while both are nomadic, the irish travellers are roman catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. they have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. they are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. in times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. tinsmiths were so prevalent among irish travellers that the terms tinker and irish traveller were used interchangeably. today, tinker is one of many names for irish travellers. horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. they continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. today, irish travellers mainly work in recycling. changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. irish travellers are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. as is the case with the romani, the irish travellers are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. people distrust their nomadic culture and their language, shelta. many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the irish travellers trick innocent people. but this is not true. it is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. once heavily infused with irish gaelic, it is now infused with english. although both groups are nomadic, their cultures ....
the irish travellers are the largest minority in ireland. there are about 25,000 irish travellers in ireland and 1,300 in northern ireland. they are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into irish society. among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. the irish travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of india and is now widespread throughout europe. but the irish travellers are indigenous to ireland, so the two cultures are not related. while both are nomadic, the irish travellers are roman catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. they have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. they are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. in times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. tinsmiths were so prevalent among irish travellers that the terms tinker and irish traveller were used interchangeably. today, tinker is one of many names for irish travellers. horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. they continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. today, irish travellers mainly work in recycling. changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. irish travellers are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. as is the case with the romani, the irish travellers are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. people distrust their nomadic culture and their language, shelta. many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the irish travellers trick innocent people. but this is not true. it is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. once heavily infused with irish gaelic, it is now infused with english. in the past the irish travellers went around by ... in caravans.
the irish travellers are the largest minority in ireland. there are about 25,000 irish travellers in ireland and 1,300 in northern ireland. they are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into irish society. among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. the irish travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of india and is now widespread throughout europe. but the irish travellers are indigenous to ireland, so the two cultures are not related. while both are nomadic, the irish travellers are roman catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. they have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. they are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. in times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. tinsmiths were so prevalent among irish travellers that the terms tinker and irish traveller were used interchangeably. today, tinker is one of many names for irish travellers. horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. they continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. today, irish travellers mainly work in recycling. changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. irish travellers are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. as is the case with the romani, the irish travellers are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. people distrust their nomadic culture and their language, shelta. many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the irish travellers trick innocent people. but this is not true. it is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. once heavily infused with irish gaelic, it is now infused with english. irish travellers have mobile homes pulled ... now.
the irish travellers are the largest minority in ireland. there are about 25,000 irish travellers in ireland and 1,300 in northern ireland. they are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into irish society. among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. the irish travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of india and is now widespread throughout europe. but the irish travellers are indigenous to ireland, so the two cultures are not related. while both are nomadic, the irish travellers are roman catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. they have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. they are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. in times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. tinsmiths were so prevalent among irish travellers that the terms tinker and irish traveller were used interchangeably. today, tinker is one of many names for irish travellers. horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. they continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. today, irish travellers mainly work in recycling. changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. irish travellers are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. as is the case with the romani, the irish travellers are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. people distrust their nomadic culture and their language, shelta. many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the irish travellers trick innocent people. but this is not true. it is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. once heavily infused with irish gaelic, it is now infused with english. read the text and complete the gap in the sentences with the words from the text. ... are the two main problems of irish travellers.
the irish travellers are the largest minority in ireland. there are about 25,000 irish travellers in ireland and 1,300 in northern ireland. they are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into irish society. among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. the irish travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of india and is now widespread throughout europe. but the irish travellers are indigenous to ireland, so the two cultures are not related. while both are nomadic, the irish travellers are roman catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. they have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. they are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. in times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. tinsmiths were so prevalent among irish travellers that the terms tinker and irish traveller were used interchangeably. today, tinker is one of many names for irish travellers. horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. they continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. today, irish travellers mainly work in recycling. changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. irish travellers are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. as is the case with the romani, the irish travellers are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. people distrust their nomadic culture and their language, shelta. many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the irish travellers trick innocent people. but this is not true. it is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. once heavily infused with irish gaelic, it is now infused with english. the irish travellers are mistakenly taken for the nomadic romani, another ... widely spread in europe.
the irish travellers are the largest minority in ireland. there are about 25,000 irish travellers in ireland and 1,300 in northern ireland. they are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into irish society. among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. the irish travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of india and is now widespread throughout europe. but the irish travellers are indigenous to ireland, so the two cultures are not related. while both are nomadic, the irish travellers are roman catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. they have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. they are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. in times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. tinsmiths were so prevalent among irish travellers that the terms tinker and irish traveller were used interchangeably. today, tinker is one of many names for irish travellers. horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. they continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. today, irish travellers mainly work in recycling. changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. irish travellers are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. as is the case with the romani, the irish travellers are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. people distrust their nomadic culture and their language, shelta. many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the irish travellers trick innocent people. but this is not true. it is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. once heavily infused with irish gaelic, it is now infused with english. they were called tinkers, which is now ... for them.
the new government is … than the old government.
then, the best way to deal with the dilemma is to think about a career counselor.
the office ... very international.
there … a gun on the floor.
there is … information about this organization
there is not … money in the safe.
There’s something I’d like to talk to you about.
there’s usually a 14-day cooling-off … for financial products.
there … two police cars and an ambulance outside.
The room looks very clean … you … it?
the weather... hotter and hotter.
the word «psychology» … from the greek word meaning «study of the soul».
They … for 20 minutes when his mother came in.
this hap¬pens because computers … to com¬pensate for feelings of loneliness, marital and work problems, poor social life, and financial problems.
this happens because computers ... to conmpensate for feelings of loneliness, marital and work problems, poor social life, and financial problems.
this is the emergency exit so we … put a desk in front of it.
this is the employees’ car park so don’t park here. visitors … park in the visitors’ car park.
This office building … a meeting room.
this usually happens near the end of the tax year. fortunately, i don’t work twelve hours every day all year long – i’m not a …
Tomorrow at five he … football.
Tony Lam ... me some samples of his products.
ut the words in the correct order to make questio
water... at 100 degrees.
we ... 20 new buildings this year.
we are late. the film ... by the time we get to the cinema.
we … be late for the meeting with the ceo!
we don’t know whether or not a viral video will reach our market but we know that print ads do and they give us instant national publicity. …
we don’t want to spend too much time getting to the conference venue so let’s choose somewhere with a … location.
we don’t want to spend too much time getting to the conference venue so let’s choose somewhere with a … location.
we end up more than we were at the beginning.
we ... for a walk when it... raining.
we give customers a full … if they return an unused product within 30 days.
welcome, marketing team, and thank you for the hard work you’ve put in recently. …
we’re offering interest-free … this month for first-time buyers.
we’re offering interest-free … this month for first-time buyers. …. i had a very heavy … last month but this month it isn’t too bad.
we still... life on other planets.
we usually do print ads in the national newspapers but mona has suggested a viral video on the internet instead. …
We ... usually have any serious communication problems.
we were extremely tired at the end of the journey. we … for more than 24 hours.
we were good friends, we … each other for years.
What day suits you?
What did you learn from your last job?
What do you do in your free time?
What do you like best about your job?
what do you mean by a slight pay increase?
What do you think?
What’s your hotel like?
What time do you think you’ll arrive? …
What time … it …?
when a company announces good results, often its … price increases.
when a job comes along, i have to take advantage of the … and accept the work, even if i’m already busy.
When are you leaving? …
When I … it … yesterday.
When … in Thailand?
When I return home, I … a taxi from the airport to my house.
when i tell people what i do, they often say, ‘oh, i guess you love the freelance …
Where are you from?
Where are you staying?
while i … on my degree, i … interested in computer software, specifically in interactive software for teaching.
while psychology did not emerge as a separate discipline until the late 1800s, its earliest history can be traced back to the time of the ancient …
Why don’t you buy a self-study course?
Will you … the bank when you go out?
wind energy every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. a lot of energy is thought to be (1)... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! currently less than 1% of the earth's energy needs are (2)... by wind, with denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. the energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (3)... around and it is able to produce (4)... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (5)... nuclear which is estimated at around five. people are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (6)... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. one of the biggest (7)... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. in norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. bats too are a serious problem. even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (8). concerned by the numbers of bats being, killed, prompting ongoing research. read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gap (1).
wind energy every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. a lot of energy is thought to be (1)... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! currently less than 1% of the earth's energy needs are (2)... by wind, with denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. the energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (3)... around and it is able to produce (4)... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (5)... nuclear which is estimated at around five. people are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (6)... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. one of the biggest (7)... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. in norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. bats too are a serious problem. even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (8). concerned by the numbers of bats being, killed, prompting ongoing research. read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gap (2).
wind energy every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. a lot of energy is thought to be (1)... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! currently less than 1% of the earth's energy needs are (2)... by wind, with denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. the energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (3)... around and it is able to produce (4)... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (5)... nuclear which is estimated at around five. people are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (6)... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. one of the biggest (7)... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. in norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. bats too are a serious problem. even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (8). concerned by the numbers of bats being, killed, prompting ongoing research. read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gap (3).
wind energy every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. a lot of energy is thought to be (1) ... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! currently less than 1% of the earth's energy needs are (2) ... by wind, with denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. the energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (3) ... around and it is able to produce (4) ... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (5) ... nuclear which is estimated at around five. people are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (6) ... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. one of the biggest (7) ... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. in norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. bats too are a serious problem. even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (8). concerned by the numbers of bats being. killed, prompting ongoing research. read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gap (4).
wind energy every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. a lot of energy is thought to be (1)... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! currently less than 1% of the earth's energy needs are (2)... by wind, with denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. the energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (3)... around and it is able to produce (4)... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (5)... nuclear which is estimated at around five. people are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (6)... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. one of the biggest (7)... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. in norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. bats too are a serious problem. even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (8). concerned by the numbers of bats being, killed, prompting ongoing research. read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gap (5).
wind energy every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. a lot of energy is thought to be (1)... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! currently less than 1% of the earth's energy needs are (2)... by wind, with denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. the energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (3)... around and it is able to produce (4)... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (5)... nuclear which is estimated at around five. people are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (6)... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. one of the biggest (7)... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. in norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. bats too are a serious problem. even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (8). concerned by the numbers of bats being, killed, prompting ongoing research. read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gap (6).
wind energy every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. a lot of energy is thought to be (1)... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! currently less than 1% of the earth's energy needs are (2)... by wind, with denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. the energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (3)... around and it is able to produce (4)... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (5)... nuclear which is estimated at around five. people are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (6)... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. one of the biggest (7)... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. in norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. bats too are a serious problem. even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (8). concerned by the numbers of bats being, killed, prompting ongoing research. read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gap (7).
wind energy every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. a lot of energy is thought to be (1)... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! currently less than 1% of the earth's energy needs are (2)... by wind, with denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. the energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (3)... around and it is able to produce (4)... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (5)... nuclear which is estimated at around five. people are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (6)... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. one of the biggest (7)... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. in norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. bats too are a serious problem. even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (8). concerned by the numbers of bats being, killed, prompting ongoing research. read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gap (8).
would you like to have dinner with us next friday evening?
Yesterday my flight … at about three o’clock in the afternoon.
you can work whenever you choose!’ i usually just smile and agree but, actually, for a freelancer, finding the right work–life … is difficult.
you … learn some japanese if you’re going to do business in japan.
… you like something to eat?
… you … many cities when you were in France.
You need to … through security before you board the plane.
… you speak spanish before you lived in argentina?
в данном предложении инфинитив служит… to do your homework is your duty.
выберите правильную грамматическую форму. if the weather … fine tomorrow, i will go to the park.
выберите правильный перевод фразы «достичь цели».
выберите правильный перевод фразы «если бы я был тобой, я бы пошел бы к доктору».
выберите правильный тип условного предложения. if the weather were fine tomorrow, we would go to the park.
Поставьте слова в правильный порядок.
прочтите. сделайте правильный вывод согласно данному тексту. we are affected by stressful situations every day. meeting tight deadlines, being late, marriage, divorce, exams, losing a job, any changes in our life can lead to stress.
Соедините предложения с верным типом условного предложения
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